BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader

Sacred Mountain Everest by Christine Taylor-Butler [in Bloomsbury Review]

 

Sacret Mountain EverestAn informative look – underscored with lively photographs – at the history and future of Mount Everest, a sacred place for the locals, overtaken by adventurous tourism, and currently suffering the high price of so-called modern progress.

Review: “In Celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: New & Notable Books,” The Bloomsbury Review, May/June 2009

Readers: Children, Middle Grade

Published: 2009

Discussion

  • Harriet

    Amazing people who are often ignored by the media who – instead – lavish their attention on the accomplishments of foreign climbers. It’s about time we recognize that there are cultures beyond the same-old, same-old publishers show us. More than that – it’s about time we recognize that most — if not all – of the foreign climbers would die if they tried to climb without the help of the Sherpa.

    • terryhong

      Thanks for adding your comment. I completely agree with you! I firmly believe that Tenzing Norgay should be credited with being the first to reach Everest. Certainly he was the only reason Sir Edmund made it at all!

      Christine Taylor-Butler prominently celebrates Norgay’s accomplishments, thank goodness, as well as those of Norgay’s descendants who inherited their father’s devotion to the sacred mountain and continue this struggle to protect it.

      Numerous recent titles for children have emerged highlighting Norgay, as well. Tiger of the Snows by Robert Burleigh with amazing illustrations by Ed Young comes immediately to mind.

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