BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader

Dust of Eden by Mariko Nagai

 

dust of edenPlease correct me if I’m wrong here: The Japanese American imprisonment has been the focus of many, many titles for audiences of all ages, via fiction, non-fiction, poetry, short stories, plays, graphic titles, picture books, and more, but I believe Mariko Nagai‘s Dust of Eden is the first novel in verse on the subject. Again, please enlighten me otherwise …

Mina Masako Tagawa, 13, lives in Seattle with her journalist father, her homemaker mother, her rose breeder grandfather, and her track star older brother Nick. Her cat is named Basho, her best friend is Jamie. Until December 7, 1941, Mina is an ordinary American girl, and then suddenly she is reduced to a “Jap“: “We are not Americans, the eyes tell us. / We do not belong, the mouths curl up. / We are the enemy aliens, the Japs.”

Mina and her family are among the 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent taken from their homes and imprisoned during World War II. First Mina’s father is arrested without cause. After President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, the family is given a week to gather their belongings. They are initially “evacuated” to the horse stalls of Camp Harmony in Puyallup, 30 miles south of Seattle, until they are shuttled away by cattle train to the remote dust fields of Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho. “We held our breath for three / years. We did not have anything to call / our own …”

Those three years bring separation, isolation, devastation. Jamie is Mina’s one constant on the outside. One teacher renames the students with “American names. / So we can be more American, / she says.  So we will be less / the enemy alien”; a more thoughtful teacher returns the children’s identities. Father is released, only to watch Nick demonstrate his loyalty to the government that imprisoned him by offering his very life.

Nagai captures a family in flux, caught in someone else’s blame, struggling to stay together, fighting to understand. Perhaps because Nagai herself is Japanese-born and currently Tokyo-domiciled, her final “Epilogue” – a letter sent by Nick from the other side of the world – is especially compelling. While nothing is particularly new here, Nagai’s crystalline phrases, stanzas, lines that barely cover 120 pages prove gorgeously resonating.

Readers: Middle Grade, Young Adult

Published: 2014

Discussion

  • Ming Leer

    I’m glad this issue continues to be written about. History can be such a great teacher. What were Chinese Americans doing when their Japanese American counterparts were interned? I cringe at photos of “I’m Chinese” buttons from this era. Were there more supportive actions taken? Who has/Where are resources about this?

    • http://bookdragon.si.edu/ SI BookDragon

      In The Fences Between Us, author Kirby Larson’s “From the Author” two pages has a resonating story about a German American woman who reached out to her Japanese American neighbors after Pearl Harbor.

      Do you know of Densho? If not, do click on the link. They have this resource about other APA responses to Japanese American imprisonment during WWII: http://encyclopedia.densho.org/Asian%20American%20response%20to%20incarceration/ .

      I also highly recommend K. Scott Wong’s Americans First: Chinese Americans the Second World War and Mary Paik Lee’s Quiet Odyssey, which are both cited in the footnotes of that Densho page.

      Hope that helps a bit.

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