July 7-9, 2017

11AM - 9PM

Former site of Foodland at Ala Moana

HONOLULU, HAWAIʻI

– CONVERGING 50+ ARTISTS & PRACTITIONERS –

Aaron Kawai’ae’a

Acrylic works with traditional & modern themes
Aaron Kawai’ae’a

Abigail Kahilikia Romanchak

Traditional printmaking with a contemporary vision
Abigail Kahilikia Romanchak

Adam Labuen

Work that blends science and fantastical portraiture
Adam Labuen

Adrienne Keahi Pao

Photography exploring fantasy & identity
Adrienne Keahi Pao

Aloha Got Soul

Excavating rare & forgotten Hawaiian music
Aloha Got Soul

Angel Chang

Fashion inspired by rural Chinese handweaving
Angel Chang

Brandy Nālani McDougall

Tracing indigeneity & colonialism through bilingual poetry
Brandy Nālani McDougall

Calvin Hoe

Mahi ʻAi Kalo (taro farmer) & artisan
Calvin Hoe

Carl Franklin Ka’ailā’au Pao

Multidisciplinary art exploring kaona and wā
Carl Franklin Ka’ailā’au Pao

Chad Shomura

Experiments in stranger intimacy
Chad Shomura

Charles Philippe Jean-Pierre

Paintings & illustrations that contrast perception & reality
Charles Philippe Jean-Pierre

CHELOVE

DC-based street art investigating indigeneity today
CHELOVE

Craig Santos Perez

Poetic bridges from Guam to Hawaiʻi to California
Craig Santos Perez

Dr. Keanu Sai

Complicating the Hawaiian kingdom's historical narrative
Dr. Keanu Sai

Havana Libre

Uncovering Cuba's hidden surf culture
Havana Libre

Jahra ‘Rager’ Wasasala

Movement & poetry rooted in New Zealand & Fiji
Jahra ‘Rager’ Wasasala

Jess X. Snow

Queer Asian American storytelling through visual poetry
Jess X. Snow

Jocelyn Kapumealani Ng

Special effects & poetry with a fascination with the dark
Jocelyn Kapumealani Ng

John “Prime” Hina

Hawaiian storytelling through street art
John “Prime” Hina

Katelin Lili’inoe Branco

Illustrations inspired by animal/human/environmental interactions
Katelin Lili’inoe Branco

Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner

Poetry & performance exploring life in the Marshall Islands
Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner

Kayla Briët

Film & music based on Native American traditions & futures
Kayla Briët

Kealopiko

Contemporary fashion rooted in traditional Hawaiian practices
Kealopiko

Kit Yan

Poetry & stories exploring gender & race
Kit Yan

Lehua M. Taitano

Art & poetry exploring queer Chamoru identity
Lehua M. Taitano

Léuli Lunaʻi Eshrāghi

Multi-practice art centered on indigeneity & queer futures
Léuli Lunaʻi Eshrāghi

Lisa Jarrett

Comparing Self & Other as an American Black woman
Lisa Jarrett

Low Leaf

Bridging Los Angeles & the Philippines through DIY music
Low Leaf

Maika’i Tubbs

Sculptures from found materials to explore consumption & ecology
Maika’i Tubbs

Maile Andrade

Multimedia exploring Native Hawaiian creative expression
Maile Andrade

MasPaz

The power of typography & color through graffiti
MasPaz

Mazi Mutafa

Hip hop as a tool for transformative learning
Mazi Mutafa

Monica Jahan Bose

Collaborative fabric & printmaking to explore gender & climate change
Monica Jahan Bose

Naoko Wowsugi

Reciprocal exchange between art & the world
Naoko Wowsugi

Nicole A. Moore

The intersection of African American history & Hawaiʻi
Nicole A. Moore

Pōhaku Stone

Revitalizing ancient surf & he'e hōlua (Hawaiian sledding)
Pōhaku Stone

Ricky Tagaban

Material culture to explore traditional & contemporary Native Alaskan life
Ricky Tagaban

Rosanna Raymond

Multi-disciplinary art focused on contemporary Pacific Island culture
Rosanna Raymond

Shizu Saldamando

Portraits about social constructs of identity & subcultures
Shizu Saldamando

Sid M. Duenas

Multi-platform art that challenges the effectiveness of language
Sid M. Duenas

Sloane Leong

Sci-fi & futurism from an Asian Latina Polynesian cartoonist
Sloane Leong

Solomon Enos

Illustration/sculpture/painting depicting Hawaiian fantasy
Solomon Enos

Terisa Siagatonu

Queer Samoan poetry & healing arts
Terisa Siagatonu

The Surf Professor

Crafting the Papa Heʻe Nalu (traditional native Hawaiian surfboard)
The Surf Professor

TravisT

Poetry merging Hawaiian/Asian/Pacific Islander experiences
TravisT

Wiena Lin

Sensory experiences about material culture & tech waste
Wiena Lin

Wooden Wave

Murals & illustrations that merge fantasy & sustainability
Wooden Wave

‘Ae Kai is a thread which brings together elements stretching from mountain to ocean and serving as a gathering place for conversations and convergence to occur. Traditionally in Hawaiʻi, some of the most important conversations are held at ‘Ae Kai when the sun is up and the waves are out.

With this in mind, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is pleased to present ʻAe Kai: A Culture Lab on Convergence on July 7-9, 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. ʻAe Kai will take place in the former site of Foodland in Ala Moana Center, an 18,000 sq ft supermarket situated in the neighborhood between Waikiki and Kaka‘ako, and will explore the meeting points of humanity and nature in Hawaiʻi, the Pacific Islands and beyond.
Following 2016’s transformational culture labs – CrossLines in Washington, D.C. and CTRL+ALT in New York City – ‘Ae Kai will continue SmithsonianAPA's practice of community building through curated artmaking. The biggest Culture Lab to date, most of ‘Ae Kai’s participants are based or rooted in Hawaiʻi, with the majority of artists identifying as Pacific Islanders.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is a migratory museum that brings Asian Pacific American history, art and culture to you through innovative community-focused experiences.

Learn more about our current and future projects


July 7-9 | 11am-9pm

1450 Ala Moana Blvd

ASL interpretation and verbal description are available at the event. Verbal description is on demand by checking in at the Information Desk. To request any other access services not mentioned above, please email APAC@si.edu.